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A Classical Curriculum Outline
Click here for a more recent (but still unfinished) version of this curriculum in PDF format.
Page last updated :
17 March, 2010
Level 12
 Ages 16-18 --- 30-35 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Finish or review books not mastered in previous levels.
Advanced:
Level 11
 Ages 15-17 --- 30-35 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Level 10
 Ages 14-16 --- 30-35 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Xenophon's Anabasis
Introduction to calculus

 

 
Level 9
 Ages 13-15 --- 30-35 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning

 
Level 8
 Ages 12-14 --- 25-30 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Intermediate Algebra

 
Level 7
 Ages 11-13 --- 25-30 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Basic/Elementary Algebra

 
Level 6
 Ages 10-12 --- 25-30 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Introduction to Basic Algebra Concepts
Help your children with all of the above, plus read :
Climbing Parnassus, Tracy Lee Simmons

 
Level 5
 Ages 9-11 --- 20-25 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Memorize another prayer, poem, or passage in Latin
Memorize another prayer, poem, or passage in Greek
Long Division
Help your children with all of the above, plus read :
Who Killed Homer? by Victor Davis Hanson and John Heath

 
Level 4
 Ages 8-10 --- 20-25 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Memorize a prayer, poem, or passage in Latin
Memorize a prayer, poem, or passage in Greek
Long Multiplication
Finish memorizing multiplication table to 12x12
Piano and other instrument.
Lots of singing.

 
Help your children with all of the above, plus read :
 
Level 3
 Ages 7-9 --- 15-20 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
"Large Numbers" subtraction
Simple multiplication
One and two-digit multiplication; begin memorizing multiplication table
Piano
One other orchestral instrument of the child's choosing
Lots of singing.
Help your children with all of the above, plus read :
Who Killed Homer? by Victor Davis Hanson and John Heath

 
Level 2
 Ages 6-8 --- 15-20 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Memorize one date and event per week
"Large Number" addition
Subtraction
Simple multiplication concepts
Piano
Lots of singing.
Help your children with all of the above, plus read :
 
Level 1
 Ages 5-7 --- 10-15 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Memorize one date and event per week
Simple, written addition and subtraction
Nature walks and observation.
Gardening.
Introduction to piano
Lots of singing
Help your children with all of the above, plus read :
 
Level K
 Ages 4-6 --- 5-10 Hrs/Wk Structured Learning
Counting and grouping of objects
Basic addition and subtraction concepts
Nature walks and observation.
Gardening.
Read and say aloud nursery rhymes
Play simple & fun learning games
Introduction to instruments
Lots of singing
Sing songs in English and Foreign Languages

 
Help your children with all of the above, plus read :
 
Every Year
All Ages
At least one hour of reading every day: age-appropriate novels, history books, short stories, and poetry
Try not to read from textbooks, digests, or books with prepared questions. Textbooks and digests are usually heavily edited for politically correct content, and prepared questions tend to "lead" the reader. Read and discuss the original texts, questioning as you go.
Math mastery is a part of literacy.
Use math whenever possible during your day-to-day activities. Quiz your children every week or so about how they would solve a real or theoretical problem using the math they have learned to date.
No calculators for all but the hardest problems. Write all problems out, practice doing math in your head.
No more than 8 hours per week of movies or videos
No more than 3 hours per week of any kind of video game
Absolutely no regular television or radio. It's full of trivia, lies, and filfth.
Limit all phone, computer, and electronic time to 30 minutes a day total.
Sing, sing, sing. Learn new songs, nursery rhymes, popular cultural children's songs from Europe and Early America. Memorize songs in Latin, Greek, and European languages.
Master at least one classical and one or two other songs on both instruments.
Have fun!

 
Also...
Some notes on classical education
What makes a classical education "classical" is the study of classical Greek and Roman languages and culture. These are the most important subjects. Math is a close second, followed closely by European and American history.
The main goal of a classical education is to produce an educated human being, one who has a large supply of knowledge about civilization and knows how to think clearly. It is for this reason that Western Civilization is studied almost exclusively.
It is an elite education. Or if you prefer, it is an aristocratic education, in the sense of the word that Jefferson used it. It is difficult and time-consuming; only those who work hard are deserving of it. Marxist ideologies such as multiculturalism, liberalism, and egalitarianism have no place here.
Christianity has been an integral part of Western Civilization for a long time. Any good classical education will not be hostile to or dismissive of it.
Better SAT scores, improved understanding of English, easier study of other foreign languages, lower blood pressure, and being cool are great side benefits. But remember: the purpose of learning Latin and Greek is to be able to read Latin and Greek. It's a long road and a rewarding one for those with the discipline to stick with it.
"WHolistic Grading" and other such liberal nonsense cripples. Stick to a tough and consistent grading system.

Reading for Parents

Invitation to the Classics, edited by Louise Cowan and OS Guinness
Who Killed Homer? by Victor Davis Hanson and John Heath
Climbing Parnassus, Tracy Lee Simmons

Book Sellers

Curricula/Lists

Online Collections


This curriculum is being prepared in 2008 by Rusty Mason.
 

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